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The best way to make sure that doesn't happen to you is to make a well-thought out decision. Career planning is an ongoing process that can help you manage your learning and development.


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You can revisit and make use of this process all the way through your career. The career planning process has four steps:.

How to choose a career in 4 steps if you have no idea what you want to do

Step 1: knowing yourself. Step 2: finding out. Step 3: making decisions. Step 4: taking action. Once you have thought about where you are at now and where you want to be, you can work on getting to know your skills, interests and values. At the end of this step you will have a clearer idea of your work or learning goal and your individual preferences. This step is about exploring the occupations and learning areas that interest you. Once you have some idea of your occupational preferences you can research the specific skills and qualifications required for those occupations.

This step involves comparing your options, narrowing down your choices and thinking about what suits you best at this point in time. At the end of this step you will have narrowed down your options and have more of an idea of what you need to do next to help you achieve your goals. Here you plan the steps you need to take to put your plan into action. Use all you have learnt about your skills, interests and values together with the information you have gathered about the world of work to create your plan.

They don't. In most cases your decision will have little impact on the other people in your life. You, however, will have to deal with your choice for years to come.

1. What are my interests?

Make sure the career you choose is something you want to spend your day doing. Following in Someone Else's Footsteps : You may be haunted by your parents' expectations to go into the same occupation they are in. You may know it as the one that helped put food in your mouth, kept a roof over your head and even paid your way through school. As hard is it is to do, ignore the pressure you may feel to please your mum and dad. Remember, and if necessary, remind your parents, that they made their own choices and now it's your turn. What was right for them may not be for you.

In the long run, there's a good chance they'd rather see you happy in a career of your own choosing than unhappy in one you picked to please them. Red Interests include: building, implementing, organizing, producing, and delegating, which often lead to work in manufacturing, managing, directing, small business owning, and surgery. People with yellow styles perform their job responsibilities in a manner that is orderly and planned to meet a known schedule. They prefer to work where things get done with a minimum of interpretation and unexpected change.

People with a yellow style tend to be orderly, cautious, structured, loyal, systematic, solitary, methodical, and organized, and usually thrive in a research-oriented, predictable, established, controlled, measurable, orderly environment. You will want to choose a work environment or career path in which your style is welcomed and produces results. People with green styles perform their job responsibilities in a manner that is outgoing. They prefer to work where things get done with minimal analysis and where persuasion is well received by others.

People with green styles tend to be spontaneous, talkative, personal, enthusiastic, convincing, risk-taking, and competitive, and usually thrive in a team-oriented, adventurous, informal, innovative, big picture-oriented, varied environment.

People with blue styles prefer to perform their job responsibilities in a manner that is supportive and helpful to others with a minimum of confrontation. They prefer to work where they have time to think things through before acting.

How To Choose A Career Path

People with blue style tend to be insightful, reflective, selectively sociable, creative, thoughtful, emotional, imaginative, and sensitive. Usually they thrive in a cutting edge, informally paced, future-oriented environment. People with red styles prefer to perform their job responsibilities in a manner that is action-oriented and practical. They prefer to work where things happen quickly and results are seen immediately. People with red styles tend to be straightforward, assertive, logical, personable, authoritative, friendly, direct, and resourceful, and usually thrive in a self-structured, high-pressured, hierarchical, production-oriented, competitive environment.

It is important to note that interest in an activity does not necessarily indicate skill. Yellow — People with yellow Interests like job responsibilities that include organizing and systematizing, and professions that are detail-oriented, predictable, and objective. Green — People with green Interests like job responsibilities and occupations that involve persuasion, sales, promotions, and group or personal contact.

10 questions to ask yourself when choosing a career

Blue — People with blue Interests like job responsibilities and occupations that involve creative, humanistic, thoughtful, and quiet types of activities. Explore our featured colleges to find schools that both match your interests and are looking for students like you. Explore our featured business schools to find those that both match your interests and are looking for students like you. Teach or Tutor for Us. College Readiness. All Rights Reserved. The Princeton Review is not affiliated with Princeton University.


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How to Choose Career Intelligently by Sandeep Maheshwari

I would rather be a company controller. I would rather be a TV news anchor. I would rather be a tax lawyer. I would rather be a newspaper editor. I would rather be an auditor. I would rather be a musician. To start with, think about the amount of time we spend at work. The importance of selecting a career with which we are satisfied cannot be overemphasized. While some people are lucky enough to just know what they want to do and end up in satisfying careers without giving it much thought, most of us are not.

Many people don't put enough effort into choosing occupations or pick them for the wrong reasons. Maybe they choose careers that seem secure or pay well. They then end up unhappy. The best way to make sure that doesn't happen to you is to make a well-thought out decision. Career planning is an ongoing process that can help you manage your learning and development. You can revisit and make use of this process all the way through your career.

The career planning process has four steps:. Step 1: knowing yourself. Step 2: finding out. Step 3: making decisions.

2. What are my skills?

Step 4: taking action. Once you have thought about where you are at now and where you want to be, you can work on getting to know your skills, interests and values. At the end of this step you will have a clearer idea of your work or learning goal and your individual preferences. This step is about exploring the occupations and learning areas that interest you.


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  • Once you have some idea of your occupational preferences you can research the specific skills and qualifications required for those occupations. This step involves comparing your options, narrowing down your choices and thinking about what suits you best at this point in time. At the end of this step you will have narrowed down your options and have more of an idea of what you need to do next to help you achieve your goals. Here you plan the steps you need to take to put your plan into action. Use all you have learnt about your skills, interests and values together with the information you have gathered about the world of work to create your plan.

    They don't. In most cases your decision will have little impact on the other people in your life. You, however, will have to deal with your choice for years to come. Make sure the career you choose is something you want to spend your day doing.